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Doctablet Diabetes Education — Short and Sweet

February 14, 2017 0 comments | Author:

I had the honor of partnering up with Doctablet on an awesome Diabetes Education project. Doctors and patients are concerned about diabetes due to its long term complications. Thankfully, diabetes education has been shown to improve diabetes control. It has […]

I had the honor of partnering up with Doctablet on an awesome Diabetes Education project.

Doctors and patients are concerned about diabetes due to its long term complications. Thankfully, diabetes education has been shown to improve diabetes control. It has also beenn proven to decrease hospitalizations, costs and complications related to diabetes.

However, Diabetes Education can be frustrating for both health care providers and patients — for those of us in the health care field, we refer patients for education and unfortunately very few complete the courses. For patients, trying to find the time and resources to get to the classes prescribed can be challenging.

Thankfully, there are many online resources out there for patients. Sadly, none can replace that valuable face-to-face time with an educator.

Doctablet saw a need in the market to educate people in a more entertaining way. Using short, animated videos Doctablet teaches important lessons through stories and brightly colored analogy.

On behalf of Doctablet, I am proud to introduce the world’s first animated Diabetes Educational resource. These short videos and illustrated articles were designed to extend the physician visit. Consider watching and sharing with patients or family and friends. Doctablet Diabetes is easy to watch and simple to understand!


When should I check my blood sugar?

January 23, 2017 0 comments | Author:

  Christopher R. Palmeiro, D.O., M.Sc.   As previously outlined in our article on the top 10 things to discuss with your doctor at your next diabetes check – your fingerstick blood sugars are atop the list! Fingerstick blood sugar […]

 

Christopher R. Palmeiro, D.O., M.Sc.

 

As previously outlined in our article on the top 10 things to discuss with your doctor at your next diabetes check – your fingerstick blood sugars are atop the list!

Fingerstick blood sugar values can at times be extremely useful to review with your doctor. The opposite can be true as well. You might be surprised when your doctor tells you he/she no longer needs to see your blood sugar logs! Considering the requirements can vary from patient to patient, we will cover the basics today.

1. The correct time to check your blood sugar is immediately prior to meals and two hours after a meal. However this is often simplified by the doctor when he/she instructs you to check your blood sugar before meals and at bedtime. As an example, if you eat breakfast at 9 a.m. and lunch and noon and check your blood sugar before meals and then two hours later, that is a lot of blood sugar checking (9 a.m., 11 a.m., noon). Alternately, if you were to check it before meals (before breakfast and before lunch in this example) the doctor would have a similar amount of information to work with (9 a.m. and noon) and could save you from having to perform the additional check.
To summarize, checking your blood sugar immediately BEFORE MEALS and AT BEDTIME can provide a tremendous amount of information to your doctor. Most patients do not need to check a two-hour after eating value if they simply check the blood sugar value before the following meal instead.

2. Just because the correct time to check your blood sugar is before meals and at bedtime, this does not mean everyone should check their sugar four times per day. At your next visit, ask your doctor how many blood sugar checks are appropriate for you. For many patients with Type 2 diabetes, a single check per day can suffice, so long as the time of day you check is variable. That brings us to the next point, the rule of alternating.

3. Check your blood sugar at different times during the day. Be sure to still follow the rule of appropriate timing – BEFORE MEALS and at BEDTIME. Please do not simply check your blood sugar before breakfast every day. Check it before lunch, before dinner and at bedtime too.
We call this behavior, the rule of ALTERNATING. Alternating when you check your blood sugar will give your doctor far more information and he/she will be better able to target the issue when choosing diabetic medications.

4. Bring a timed glucose log with you to your next doctor visit. If you are going to check your sugar at variable and alternating times, please also keep a diary for the values with the time and bring it to your visit. Please do not simply bring your glucometer and expect your doctor to be able to go through every value. Keeping a log with the times, can help the doctor quickly identify abnormal patterns.

5. Lastly, know the name of your glucometer and the brand of testing strips and lancets you use. Keep that information on your medication list and bring it to all of your visits. Knowing the type names of the diabetic supplies and where you get them from falls within the patient’s responsibilities, so do not forget to bring the name of your supplies to your next doctor visit. In case the doctor needs to refill testing supplies, knowing the machine brand, testing strip name, and lancet type is important.


10 things to discuss at your next diabetes checkup

January 6, 2017 0 comments | Author:

Christopher R. Palmeiro, D.O., M.Sc.   Diabetes can be overwhelming. Between checking your blood sugar, taking medications at the appropriate time, injecting insulin if it is prescribed, watching your diet and following up with several different types of doctors, it […]

Christopher R. Palmeiro, D.O., M.Sc.

 

Diabetes can be overwhelming. Between checking your blood sugar, taking medications at the appropriate time, injecting insulin if it is prescribed, watching your diet and following up with several different types of doctors, it can be hard to keep track of everything you need to do.

 

If you have diabetes, doctors will keep a closer eye on certain parts of your health. For example, eye checkups and foot checks should occur at least once a year.

 

Here is a list of the top ten things you should discuss with your doctor at your next diabetes checkup (hint – they are all important).

 

  1. Your fingerstick blood sugars – Things to discuss would be how often the doctor expects you to monitor your sugar, how your blood sugar levels have been running, and whether your prescription for testing supplies is up to date. To help out, you should consider bringing your blood sugar log to the visit, as well as your glucose testing machine (glucometer). In case the doctor needs to refill testing supplies, knowing the machine and testing strip name is important.
  2. Hypoglycemia – Some might argue this falls under number 1 above, but it is so important that it got its own category. One of the most important things you can discuss with your doctor is whether your sugar is getting too low at home, a condition health care professionals call hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia has been tied to many serious problems, including heart electrical problems called arrhythmias. These can be very dangerous and lead to death.
  3. Your A1c – The Hemoglobin A1c is a blood test that tells the doctor what your average blood sugar has been over the past two to three months. The ideal A1c goal number is often under 7%, but this varies with the individual. It is good to know your A1c and what the doctor considers your goal number.
  4. Your last cholesterol test – Doctors have tighter cholesterol goals for those affected by diabetes. The bad cholesterol (LDL) goal is often lower than what can be achieved by diet alone. For this reason, most patients with diabetes are offered a cholesterol pill called a “statin.” You should have your cholesterol drawn and tested at least once per year.
  5. Your last urine test for microalbumin – Microalbumin is a tiny amount of protein that can be found by checking the urine — it is a marker for microscopic kidney damage. You cannot feel this damage, and so this test is important. This test is done in addition to blood testing, so make sure you have a urine sample test at least once a year.
  6. Your diabetes medications – This is a big topic, but generally speaking, doctors now have more classes of medications to choose from. The newer guidelines suggest using medications that assist with weight loss, while not causing hypoglycemia.
  7. Your last influenza and pneumococcal vaccines – Patients with diabetes have different vaccine recommendations than the general population. This is due to the increased risk of hospitalization for the flu and pneumonia seen in those with diabetes.
  8. Your last dilated eye exam – A full eye exam is recommended at least yearly to screen for what doctors call retinopathy. Retinopathy is damage to the small blood vessels in the back of the eye, which are very sensitive to high blood sugar.
  9. Your last comprehensive foot check – This is recommended at least once a year, and should include testing for nerve damage by touching the bottom of the foot with a light filament.
  10. Your last diabetes education class – Ongoing diabetes education is extremely important to help manage diabetes. In fact, Medicare will pay for thorough education at diagnosis, as well as two additional hours of education each year.


The Insulin Pen Party

December 15, 2016 0 comments | Author:

Patients often find starting insulin overwhelming. Nowadays, insulin comes in pen form which has made injecting a whole lot easier. However, patients still need training which can be time consuming for the provider and challenging to follow for the patient. […]

Patients often find starting insulin overwhelming. Nowadays, insulin comes in pen form which has made injecting a whole lot easier. However, patients still need training which can be time consuming for the provider and challenging to follow for the patient.

We searched for a trustworthy and solid resource to refer our staff and patients to, but it did not exist, until now:

 

insulin-pen-w-logo


Doctablet

December 2, 2016 0 comments | Author:

Dr. Christopher Palmeiro is also the co-founder of Doctablet. Doctablet is a free resource where patients can learn about their health in a fun and easy to understand way.

Dr. Christopher Palmeiro is also the co-founder of Doctablet. Doctablet is a free resource where patients can learn about their health in a fun and easy to understand way.

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